Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) 2022 Open Call: NYC Department of Design and Construction

Ends on July 22, 2022

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2022

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Department of Design and Construction

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2022. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Design and Construction, the Department of Homeless Services, the NYC Health + Hospitals, and the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes. This application is for a residency with the Department of Design and Construction.

About PAIR

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation. Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 24 artists in 15 agencies, including Amanda Phingbodhippakia at the Commission on Human Rights, Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Yazmany Arboleda at the Civic Engagement Commission, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here.

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply.

Residency Structure

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a four-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency.

The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.

Throughout the residency, the artist, partner agency, and DCLA have weekly virtual or in-person check-in meetings to assist in project development.

Artist Fee and Materials

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., materials, fabrication, participant stipends, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.

NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions.

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

  • A desk at the partner agency, with office access based on regular building hours
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts

Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works. Materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports, promotional materials, and campaign content) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements with trusted legal counsel as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2022

PAIR 2022 will launch four (4) new residencies with the following partner agencies:

  • Department of Design and Construction
  • Department of Homeless Services
  • NYC Health + Hospitals
  • Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the Department of Design and Construction. The other 2022 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency.

About the Department of Design and Construction

The New York City Department of Design and Construction (DDC) works with 28 City agencies to manage design and construction projects throughout the five boroughs. As the City's primary capital construction project manager, DDC builds many of the civic facilities New Yorkers use every day. The agency provides communities with new or renovated structures such as firehouses, libraries, police precincts, courthouses, senior centers and more.

In addition, New York City has the most extensive network of streets, water mains, and storm and sanitary sewers. DDC builds and upgrades this system, while also taking care of step streets, retaining walls, pedestrian bridges and plazas. DDC’s client agencies – the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) – furnish the planning and funding of these projects. It is the role of DDC to provide the highest standard of engineering design and construction management for successful delivery.

During construction DDC also helps local businesses keep their doors open - the innovative trenchless technologies of DDC reduce disruption to commercial activities. DDC realizes that there may be some inconveniences. DDC works closely with Office of Community Outreach and Notification to make sure communities are heard and informed.

For more information about DDC, visit: www.nyc.gov/ddc.

The Opportunities and Challenges

This PAIR residency will focus on a year-long creative inquiry into NYC street excavations: what happens below the surface and the roadway reconstruction that follows. DDC’s Roadway Reconstruction/Infrastructure Projects happen in every NYC neighborhood at some time to:

  • upgrade old water transmission infrastructure to continue to bring the world’s best water to all at low costs (largely using gravity, a sustainable solution)
  • upgrade old sewer transmission infrastructure, with new catchment basins and green infrastructure rain gardens, to reduce damage from severe storms and combined sewer overflows (a resilient solution), and
  • upgrade sidewalks, with pedestrian ramps (the last part of the Civil Rights Act), plazas, plantings, new light poles, and Percent for Art projects, making the civic street space more functional, accessible, and beautiful.

While street excavations are a sign of a city doing its job creating economic growth and maintaining or expanding its infrastructure systems to serve people’s needs, they often result in temporary increased surface congestion. The average citizen often does not understand the reasons for the work, the relation of the subsurface “spaghetti” to broader systems, or the end result.

A PAIR artist can help make the typically invisible, visible and understandable for neighbors and community members around a DDC construction site. By exploring, imagining, and creating, a PAIR artist can help the public understand the challenges and complexities of providing infrastructure in a city with the over-arching goals of creating a sustainable, resilient, and equitable City. Creative community engagement could start before the construction begins, increasing awareness among community members and help build local connections. Engagement during construction provides the opportunity to build knowledge and appreciation for the challenging and goals of building 21st century civic infrastructure, and ultimately, hopefully, greater stewardship.

The Call

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words) Based on the background information provided by the Department of Design and Construction, what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? Please note that this open call is not a request for project proposals or predetermined projects; we expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.

2. Statement of Interest (250 words) How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. Describe a challenge that you previously faced during this work and how you addressed it. Please be specific.

3. Artist Statement (250 words) Provide a statement describing your artistic practice.

4. Resume or CV. Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call.

5. References. Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.

6. Work Samples. Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.

7. Work Sample List. Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria

Artist applications will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, DDC, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:

  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
  • Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
  • Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.

Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist should be deeply interested in NYC’s physical landscape and/or neighborhood planning and development, have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within government systems.

In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.
  • Artists must be 18 years of age or older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City.
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

COVID 19 Vaccination Policy

Artists working alongside City employees in locations controlled by the City (i.e. agency offices, etc.) must provide proof of full COVID 19 vaccination. Artists must also agree to wear a mask when interacting with the public.

Timeline

  • Application Deadline: Friday, July 22, 2022. Applications must be submitted online via Submittable by 11:59pm on Friday, July 22, 2022.
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of August 15, 2022. Interviews will be conducted virtually.
  • Artist Notifications: Week of August 29, 2022
  • Residency Start Date: September 2022
  • Residency End Date: August 2023

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.

Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) 2022 Open Call: NYC Department of Homeless Services

Ends on July 22, 2022

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2022

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Department of Homeless Services

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2022. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Design and Construction, the Department of Homeless Services, the NYC Health + Hospitals, and the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes. This application is for a residency with the Department of Homeless Services.

About PAIR

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation. Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 24 artists in 15 agencies, including Amanda Phingbodhippakia at the Commission on Human Rights, Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Yazmany Arboleda at the Civic Engagement Commission, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here.

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply.

Residency Structure

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a four-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency.

The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.

Throughout the residency, the artist, partner agency, and DCLA have weekly virtual or in-person check-in meetings to assist in project development.

Artist Fee and Materials

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., materials, fabrication, participant stipends, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.

NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions.

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

  • A desk at the partner agency, with office access based on regular building hours
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts

Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works. Materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports, promotional materials, and campaign content) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements with trusted legal counsel as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2022

PAIR 2022 will launch four (4) new residencies with the following partner agencies:

  • Department of Design and Construction
  • Department of Homeless Services
  • NYC Health + Hospitals
  • Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the Department of Homeless Services. The other 2022 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency.

About the Department of Homeless Services

Together with not-for-profit partners, the mission of the Department of Homeless Services (DHS) is to prevent homelessness when possible, address street homelessness, provide safe temporary shelter, and connect New Yorkers experiencing homelessness to suitable housing. DHS does this with accountability, empathy, and equity.

As an agency comprised of 2,000 employees, with an annual operating budget of over $2 billion, DHS is one of the largest organizations of its kind committed to preventing and addressing homelessness in New York City. As it engages in this mission, DHS employs a variety of innovative strategies to help families and individuals successfully exit shelter and return to self-sufficiency as quickly as possible. DHS carries out this work and mission with care and compassion for each client and their circumstances.

For more information about DHS, visit Inside DHS - DHS (nyc.gov).

The Opportunities and Challenges

Currently, approximately 45,000 New Yorkers sleep in shelter and approximately 2,400 individuals are unsheltered on any given night. Each person in shelter has a unique experience and path that led them to experience homelessness. Unfortunately, the narrative of homelessness is largely driven by sensational representations of the experience but fails to tell the more nuanced stories of the individuals and families. The Department of Homeless Services wishes to partner with a PAIR artist to help reframe how New Yorkers think about and understand the experience of homelessness and address the question, “Who are our clients? People, like you and me.”

The Call

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words) Based on the background information provided by the Department of Homeless Services, what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? Please note that this open call is not a request for project proposals or predetermined projects; we expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.

2. Statement of Interest (250 words) How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. Describe a challenge that you previously faced during this work and how you addressed it. Please be specific.

3. Artist Statement (250 words) Provide a statement describing your artistic practice.

4. Resume or CV. Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call.

5. References. Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.

6. Work Samples. Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.

7. Work Sample List. Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria

Artist applications will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, DHS, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:

  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
  • Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
  • Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.

Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist should be deeply interested in NYC’s physical landscape and/or neighborhood planning and development, have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within government systems.

In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.
  • Artists must be 18 years of age or older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City.
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

COVID 19 Vaccination Policy

Artists working alongside City employees in locations controlled by the City (i.e. agency offices, etc.) must provide proof of full COVID 19 vaccination. Artists must also agree to wear a mask when interacting with the public.

Timeline

  • Application Deadline: Friday, July 22, 2022. Applications must be submitted online via Submittable by 11:59pm on Friday, July 22, 2022.
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of August 15, 2022. Interviews will be conducted virtually.
  • Artist Notifications: Week of August 29, 2022
  • Residency Start Date: September 2022
  • Residency End Date: August 2023

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.

Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) 2022 Open Call: Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes

Ends on July 22, 2022

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2022

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2022. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Design and Construction, the Department of Homeless Services, the NYC Health + Hospitals, and the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes. This application is for a residency with the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes.

About PAIR

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation. Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 24 artists in 15 agencies, including Amanda Phingbodhippakia at the Commission on Human Rights, Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Yazmany Arboleda at the Civic Engagement Commission, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here.

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply.

Residency Structure

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a four-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency.

The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.

Throughout the residency, the artist, partner agency, and DCLA have weekly virtual or in-person check-in meetings to assist in project development.

Artist Fee and Materials

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., materials, fabrication, participant stipends, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.

NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions.

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

  • A desk at the partner agency, with office access based on regular building hours
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts

Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works. Materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports, promotional materials, and campaign content) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements with trusted legal counsel as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2022

PAIR 2022 will launch four (4) new residencies with the following partner agencies:

  • Department of Design and Construction
  • Department of Homeless Services
  • NYC Health + Hospitals
  • Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes. The other 2022 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency.

About the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes

The Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes (OPHC) was created through New York City Council passage of NYC Local Law 46 and Local Law 47 in 2019. The office opened in the summer of 2019 in response to an escalation of hate crimes. OPHC takes a holistic approach to preventing hate crimes, developing and coordinating community-driven prevention strategies to address biases fueling such crimes, and fostering healing for victims and their communities.

OPHC coordinates the City’s efforts through networks of community-based providers and organizations such as the Partners Against the Hate (P.A.T.H.) FORWARD Initiative and its interagency committee, which consists of over 20 city agencies and all five District Attorney Hate Crime Units. OPHC is strategic in using non-law enforcement deterrence, including public education, outreach and community safety models and preventative best practices. It also works with partners to respond to hate crimes, including developing strategies so that the criminal justice system has options beyond arrest and prosecution, and to build long-term preventative approaches and resources to build respect and educate the public about the consequences of prejudice, bigotry and hate on individuals and communities. For more information about OPHC, visit Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes (nyc.gov).

The Opportunities and Challenges

OPHC spent its first years within the context of the global pandemic, coordinating initiatives around hate crime prevention and response through a largely virtual space. While the Office hoped to always build long-term projects incorporating more creative elements, it had to prioritize the immediate needs of establishing the office within the public consciousness and situating itself within New York City’s complex networks of stakeholders.

Now, three years later, OPHC is ready to engage New Yorkers through new mediums and platforms and to fully capture its work and that of its partners, as well as the narratives of those most vulnerable to hate. OPHC hopes to collaborate with a PAIR artist to memorialize the unheard stories of our city to reorient discussions on hate violence and serve as a bridge between communities.

The Call

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words) Based on the background information provided by the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes, what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? Please note that this open call is not a request for project proposals or predetermined projects; we expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.

2. Statement of Interest (250 words) How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. Describe a challenge that you previously faced during this work and how you addressed it. Please be specific.

3. Artist Statement (250 words) Provide a statement describing your artistic practice.

4. Resume or CV. Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call.

5. References. Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.

6. Work Samples. Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.

7. Work Sample List. Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria

Artist applications will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, OPHC, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:

  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
  • Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
  • Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.

Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist should be deeply interested in NYC’s physical landscape and/or neighborhood planning and development, have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within government systems.

In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.
  • Artists must be 18 years of age or older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City.
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

COVID 19 Vaccination Policy

Artists working alongside City employees in locations controlled by the City (i.e. agency offices, etc.) must provide proof of full COVID 19 vaccination. Artists must also agree to wear a mask when interacting with the public.

Timeline

  • Application Deadline: Friday, July 22, 2022. Applications must be submitted online via Submittable by 11:59pm on Friday, July 22, 2022.
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of August 15, 2022. Interviews will be conducted virtually.
  • Artist Notifications: Week of August 29, 2022
  • Residency Start Date: September 2022
  • Residency End Date: August 2023

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.

Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) 2022 Open Call: NYC Health + Hospitals

Ends on July 22, 2022

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2022

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & NYC Health + Hospitals

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2022. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Design and Construction, the Department of Homeless Services, the NYC Health + Hospitals, and the Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes. This application is for a residency with the NYC Health + Hospitals.

About PAIR

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation. Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 24 artists in 15 agencies,including Amanda Phingbodhippakia at the Commission on Human Rights, Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Yazmany Arboleda at the Civic Engagement Commission, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here.

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply.

Residency Structure

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a four-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency.

The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.

Throughout the residency, the artist, partner agency, and DCLA have weekly virtual or in-person check-in meetings to assist in project development.

Artist Fee and Materials

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., materials, fabrication, participant stipends, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.

NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions.

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

  • A desk at the partner agency, with office access based on regular building hours
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts

Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works. Materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports, promotional materials, and campaign content) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements with trusted legal counsel as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2022

PAIR 2022 will launch four (4) new residencies with the following partner agencies:

  • Department of Design and Construction
  • Department of Homeless Services
  • NYC Health + Hospitals
  • Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the NYC Health + Hospitals. The other 2022 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency.

About the NYC Health + Hospitals

NYC H+H is the largest public health care system in the United States. The system provides essential inpatient, outpatient, and home-based services to more than one million New Yorkers every year in more than 70 locations across the city’s five boroughs. The system provides 5.1 million ambulatory visits that include primary, specialty, and emergency care and discharges over 210,000 patients from its acute hospitals. In addition to its primary mission to provide care to patients regardless of their ability to pay, NYC H+H plays several other critical roles in NYC and for the United States. NYC H+H works closely with other public health agencies in NYC in a public health role for diseases, prevention programs, as well as chronic diseases. NYC H+H is the safety net for all 8.4 million New Yorkers and serves over 1.2 million New Yorkers annually, almost 400,000 of whom are uninsured. Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, NYC H+H played a critical public health role in protecting and serving New Yorkers, providing quality and compassionate care to over 400,000 New Yorkers discharged from its hospitals or emergency departments and administering over 1.7 million vaccination doses. Our mission is to provide care to everyone, regardless of ability to pay, immigration status, gender identity, disability, or national origin. As such, it is a crucial part of our mission to provide accessible, culturally, linguistically appropriate services to ensure full access to comprehensive and quality care for all.

NYC Health + Hospitals Arts in Medicine

The Arts in Medicine department at NYC Health + Hospitals seeks to foster the emotional well-being and promote healing and wellness for all patients and their families, employees, and the greater Health + Hospitals community by utilizing disciplines of the arts including literary, visual, and performing arts throughout the Health + Hospitals system.

In addition to managing the system’s significant visual arts collection, the Art in Medicine department encourages evidenced based practices and provides technical assistance to all of our health care facilities and clinics. This is accomplished by combining artistic innovation and education into high-quality healthcare that supports the healing benefits of the arts.

For more information about H+H, visit NYC Health + Hospitals.

The Opportunities and Challenges

NYC H+H is dedicated to systemwide initiatives to bring together healthcare, public health and our NYC communities to stop the cycle of gun and group violence, the leading cause of death among youth aged 13-24. NYC H+H currently has multiple programs and departments working on this complex issue. These include prevention services, community mobilization and numerous hospital Interventions.

Several programs addressing gun violence use a community-centered approach to engage partners to prevent and interrupt violence by empowering youth to fulfill their potential through leading safer, healthier lives. This is accomplished by engaging youth early in long-term mentorship and developmental activities to divert involvement from violent peer groups and behaviors; and through community mobilization by partnering with concerned organizations and neighborhood residents to build community strategies to reduce neighborhood violence. Opportunities for youth to engage in positive activities such as sports, dance and the arts is one aspect of H+H’s comprehensive systemwide violence prevention strategy.

A PAIR artist will play a critical role in bringing NYC Health + Hospital’s communication concerning gun violence to a larger audience. Through this residency there is a tremendous opportunity to explore and develop alternative strategies around advocacy, safety and wellness that address the gun violence crisis, through an artist’s lens to create meaningful public dialogue.

The Call

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words) Based on the background information provided by the NYC Health + Hospitals, what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? Please note that this open call is not a request for project proposals or predetermined projects; we expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.

2. Statement of Interest (250 words) How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. Describe a challenge that you previously faced during this work and how you addressed it. Please be specific.

3. Artist Statement (250 words) Provide a statement describing your artistic practice.

4. Resume or CV. Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call.

5. References. Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.

6. Work Samples. Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.

7. Work Sample List. Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria

Artist applications will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, H+H, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:

  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
  • Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
  • Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.

Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist should be deeply interested in NYC’s physical landscape and/or neighborhood planning and development, have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within government systems.

In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.
  • Artists must be 18 years of age or older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City.
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

COVID 19 Vaccination Policy

Artists working alongside City employees in locations controlled by the City (i.e. agency offices, etc.) must provide proof of full COVID 19 vaccination. Artists must also agree to wear a mask when interacting with the public.

Timeline

  • Application Deadline: Friday, July 22, 2022. Applications must be submitted online via Submittable by 11:59pm on Friday, July 22, 2022.
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of August 15, 2022. Interviews will be conducted virtually.
  • Artist Notifications: Week of August 29, 2022
  • Residency Start Date: September 2022
  • Residency End Date: August 2023

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs