OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2020 

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & Civic Engagement Commission 

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2020. Each selected artist will be placed in residence with a different City agency. 

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation. 

Examples of PAIRs to date include Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh at the Commission on Human Rights, Taja Lindley at the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here. 

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply. 

Residency Structure: Research and Implementation Phases

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which launches a three-month Research Phase. This phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the host agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency. The project must be collaborative in nature and include one (1) public-facing event or component. Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project development. 

Artist Fee and Materials 

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., printing, fabrication, equipment rental, wages for collaborators, video production, etc.). The selected artist(s) are responsible for managing the project budget and submitting invoices. No additional funding is provided. 

DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR, rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions. All funds ($40,000 total) are paid directly to the artist, who manages all program costs. We encourage artists to take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit. 

Additionally, the artist receives: 

  • A desk at the host agency, with office access based on      regular building hours. 
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts.

Artist Agreements and Intellectual Property Rights 

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign a Public Artist in Residence Agreement (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works; and materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports and promotional materials) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements as soon as they are received to avoid delays. 

PAIR 2020 

PAIR 2020 will launch four new residencies with the following partner agencies: 

  • The Department of Sanitation 
  • The Commission on Human Rights 
  • The Civic Engagement Commission 
  • The Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice 

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence for the Civic Engagement Commission 

The other open calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls, but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency. 

About the Civic Engagement Commission (CEC)

The NYC Civic Engagement Commission (CEC)’s programs aim to change the status quo by creating more inclusive and accessible civic opportunities that engage communities beyond the electoral process. Established in 2018, CEC’s mission is to create a more civically empowered New Yorker who understands that their unique lived experience, language, and voice are an integral part of building a more equitable and democratic city. The CEC accomplishes these goals through multi-sector partnerships, by amplifying existing civic engagement activities and implementing new ones. CEC is developing the infrastructure to implement City Charter mandates including: citywide participatory budgeting, which is open to all New Yorkers over the age of 16 regardless of citizenship status; providing increased access to language interpreters at poll sites in order to reduce the likelihood that Limited English Proficiency New Yorkers face language barriers when exercising their right to vote; strengthening and diversifying Community Boards through support and technical assistance; and creating accessible and interactive civic education tools and strategies to empower and engage disaffected, underserved and underrepresented communities. 

The CEC is also tasked with creating ways to assist city agencies in developing civic engagement initiatives. This interagency collaboration is essential to centralizing public information about opportunities for civic engagement across the city and supporting best practices, including continuous improvement through stakeholder input in user-centered design and implementation of city programs. 

To learn more about CEC, visit: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/civicengagement/index.page

The Challenge

CEC seeks an artist to support its efforts in generating nonconventional ways to empower the public to be heard and connect their own voices and needs to meaningful participation. CEC’s outcomes will only be as powerful as its ability to inspire people to ‘show up’ and contribute. Through its mandates, CEC has the potential to make a direct impact in people’s lives, but it must create an environment of trust, deep listening, and responsive action. This work is centered on building processes that promote genuine dialogue and are accountable to community input and representation. 

The selected artist will have the ability to energize local communities by identifying themes that deeply resonate and inspire residents to make desired changes at a local level, empower leadership, and reach out and pull in traditionally underserved communities. Furthermore, embedded within a newly established commission, the artist will have a unique opportunity to work collaboratively with CEC staff engaged in creating tools and opportunities that foster greater civic involvement from youth, immigrant communities, people with disabilities, seniors, and veterans. 

The Call 

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials: 

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words) 

Based on the background information provided by CEC what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? (Note: We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.) 

2. Statement of Interest (250 words) 

How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with CEC's constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific. 

3. Artist Statement (250 words) 

Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples. 

4. Resume or CV. 

Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call. 

5. References. Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference. 

6. Work Samples. Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials. 

7. Work Sample List. Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed. 

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria 

Artists responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, CEC, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as: 

  • Artistic merit and artistic excellence of the proposed project
  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
  • Quality of and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change 
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection. 

Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist(s) should be able to demonstrate a level of involvement/connection to the CEC’s mission and/or the challenge set forth in this call. They should have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within the framework of municipal systems. In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity). 
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor. 
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City. 
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

TIMELINE 

  • Application Deadline: 11:59pm on Sunday, March 29, 2020 
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of April 20 – May 1, 2020 

To take place at the Department of Cultural Affairs, 31 Chambers Street, NY NY, 10007 

  • Artist Selection/Notification: May 6, 2020 
  • Residency Start Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 
  • Residency End Date: Wednesday, June 30, 2021 

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s). 

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov. 

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2020 

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & NYC Department of Sanitation

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2020. Each selected artist will be placed in residence with a different City agency. 

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation.

Examples of PAIRs to date include Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh at the Commission on Human Rights, Taja Lindley at the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here. 

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply. 

Residency Structure: Research and Implementation Phases

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which launches a three-month Research Phase. This phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the host agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency. The project must be collaborative in nature and include one (1) public-facing event or component. Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project development. 

Artist Fee and Materials 

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., printing, fabrication, equipment rental, wages for collaborators, video production, etc.). The selected artist(s) are responsible for managing the project budget and submitting invoices. No additional funding is provided. 

DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR, rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions. All funds ($40,000 total) are paid directly to the artist, who manages all program costs. We encourage artists to take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit. 

Additionally, the artist receives: 

  • A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours. 
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts.

Artist Agreements and Intellectual Property Rights 

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign a Public Artist in Residence Agreement (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works; and materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports and promotional materials) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements as soon as they are received to avoid delays. 

PAIR 2020 

PAIR 2020 will launch four new residencies with the following partner agencies: 

  • The Department of Sanitation 
  • The Commission on Human Rights 
  • The Civic Engagement Commission 
  • The Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice 

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence for the Department of Sanitation. 

The other open calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls, but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency. 

About the Department of Sanitation (DSNY)

The Department of Sanitation (DSNY) keeps New York City healthy, safe and clean by collecting, recycling and disposing of waste, cleaning streets and vacant lots, and clearing snow and ice.

DSNY is the world’s largest sanitation department. It collects more than 10,500 tons of residential and institutional garbage and 1,760 tons of recyclables – each day. While efficiently managing solid waste and clearing litter or snow from 6,300 miles of streets, the Department is also a leader in environmentalism — committing to sending zero waste to landfills.

Sanitation work is some of the most dangerous work in the country. In her book Picking Up, DSNY’s anthropologist-in-residence Robin Nagle cites the Bureau of Labor Statistics to note that refuse and recycling collection is about twice as deadly as police work and five times as deadly as firefighting. Now that the City and DSNY are moving forward with reforming the commercial carting industry, one rife with real safety issues, it is an opportune time to highlight the positive example that DSNY sets and show why this reform work is essential to protect all New Yorkers—sanitation workers and civilians alike. Planned reforms include requiring health and safety plans from private carters operating in the City to govern worker safety and prevent civilian fatalities, of which dozens have occurred over the past decade. Carters will also face penalties or contract termination if they cannot demonstrate proper driver certifications and training, legal and environmental compliance, and emergency action plans. See DSNY’s Commercial Waste Zones Plan for more info. 

One of the most critical ways that DSNY engages with the public is in its role as first responders during snow events and blizzards in New York City. The department also educates New Yorkers about their part in waste management, including how to recycle and dispose of hazardous waste properly, though educational programs and community events. 

To learn more about DSNY, visit: www.nyc.gov/sanitation

The Challenge

DSNY seeks to work with an artist-in-residence who will bring dignity, respect, and appreciation to the critical, but often invisible, waste management work. It is an opportunity to for an artist to highlight the real safety risks in the sanitation industry, and to raise public awareness about the dangers of the industry and promote safe practices by workers and drivers alike. For the residency, DSNY encourages site visits to sanitation facilities throughout the City, which may require the need to wear safety equipment, such as hard hats, or may have some accessibility issues, such as the need to use staircases. 

The Call 

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials: 

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words) 

Based on the background information provided by DSNY what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? (Note: We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.) 

2. Statement of Interest (250 words) 

How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with DSNY 's constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific. 

3. Artist Statement (250 words) 

Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples. 

4. Resume or CV. 

Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call. 

5. References. Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference. 

6. Work Samples. Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials. 

7. Work Sample List. Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed. 

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria 

Artists responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, DSNY, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as: 

  • Artistic merit and artistic excellence of the proposed project
  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
  • Quality of and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change 
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection. 

Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist(s) should be able to demonstrate a level of involvement/connection to the DSNY’s mission and/or the challenge set forth in this call. They should have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within the framework of municipal systems. In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity). 
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor. 
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City. 
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

TIMELINE 

  • Application Deadline: 11:59pm on Sunday, March 29, 2020 
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of April 20 – May 1, 2020 

To take place at the Department of Cultural Affairs, 31 Chambers Street, NY NY, 10007 

  • Artist Selection/Notification: May 6, 2020 
  • Residency Start Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 
  • Residency End Date: Wednesday, June 30, 2021 

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s). 

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov. 

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2020 

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & New York City Commission on Human Rights

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2020. Each selected artist will be placed in residence with a different City agency. 

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation. 

Examples of PAIRs to date include Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh at the Commission on Human Rights, Taja Lindley at the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here. 

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply. 

Residency Structure: Research and Implementation Phases

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which launches a three-month Research Phase. This phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the host agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency. The project must be collaborative in nature and include one (1) public-facing event or component. Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project development. 

Artist Fee and Materials 

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., printing, fabrication, equipment rental, wages for collaborators, video production, etc.). The selected artist(s) are responsible for managing the project budget and submitting invoices. No additional funding is provided. 

DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR, rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions. All funds ($40,000 total) are paid directly to the artist, who manages all program costs. We encourage artists to take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit. 

Additionally, the artist receives: 

  • A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours. 
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts.

Artist Agreements and Intellectual Property Rights 

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign a Public Artist in Residence Agreement (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works; and materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports and promotional materials) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements as soon as they are received to avoid delays. 

PAIR 2020 

PAIR 2020 will launch four new residencies with the following partner agencies: 

  • The Department of Sanitation 
  • The Commission on Human Rights 
  • The Civic Engagement Commission 
  • The Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice 

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence for the Commission on Human Rights. The other open calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls, but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency. 

About the Commission on Human Rights (Commission)

The New York City Commission on Human Rights (“Commission”) is charged with enforcing and educating New Yorkers about the New York City Human Rights Law (“City Human Rights Law”), which is among the nation’s most robust and protective local anti-discrimination statutes. The agency’s Law Enforcement Bureau (“LEB”) investigates and litigates allegations of discrimination. The agency’s Community Relations Bureau (“CRB”) helps New Yorkers to understand their rights and obligations under the City Human Rights Law and, importantly, works to foster positive community relations. The Commission issues policy guidance on different areas of the law which have served as models for legislative change across the country. 

The Commission is interested in directing attention to and creating spaces for populations that have experienced historical structural disadvantage and continue to be targeted. To date, it has done this through campaigns, like “I am Muslim, I am NYC,” highlighting the diversity of Muslim communities across the five boroughs and their integral role in the life of the city, and a campaign affirming the right of all New Yorkers, including transgender and gender non-conforming New Yorkers, to use the single-sex facilities that are most consistent with their gender identities. It has also accomplished this through the development of policy positions, including the publication of legal enforcement guidance on race discrimination based on hair and through landmark enforcement actions, including a recent a settlement with Prada regarding the sale of products reflecting racist iconography. From 2018 – 2019, the Commission and Public Artist in Residence Tatyana Fazlalizadeh worked together to highlight the issues of anti-Black racism and gender-based street harassment and the New Yorkers affected by them. You can learn more about this project on the Commission’s site

The Challenge

The Commission envisions organizing its new PAIR residency around the concept of family, broadly defined. The agency is interested in developing a collaborative project with an artist that examines intergenerational family relationships, the families that New Yorkers build in addition to traditional family structures or connections that New Yorkers have created where traditional familial bonds may no longer exist. New York City has often served as a refuge for people who have left their hometowns and often, families, behind. What communities and families New Yorkers create for themselves in the city are unique and beautiful. These might include friendships, faith communities, organizing efforts, arts communities, and other forms of bonding. We are particularly interested in highlighting chosen families, and how they are supporting New Yorkers in a challenging time in the city’s history. 

The Call 

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials: 

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words) 

Based on the background information provided by the Commission, what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? (Note: We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.) 

2. Statement of Interest (250 words) 

How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the Commission's constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific. 

3. Artist Statement (250 words) 

Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples. 

4. Resume or CV. 

Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call. 

5. References. Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference. 

6. Work Samples. Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials. 

7. Work Sample List. Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed. 

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria 

Artists responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, the Commission, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as: 

  • Artistic merit and artistic excellence of the proposed project
  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
  • Quality of and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change 
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection. 

Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist(s) should be able to demonstrate a level of involvement/connection to the Commission’s mission and/or the challenge set forth in this call. They should have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within the framework of municipal systems. In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity). 
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor. 
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City. 
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

TIMELINE 

  • Application Deadline: 11:59pm on Sunday, March 29, 2020 
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of April 20 – May 1, 2020 

To take place at the Department of Cultural Affairs, 31 Chambers Street, NY NY, 10007 

  • Artist Selection/Notification: May 6, 2020 
  • Residency Start Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 
  • Residency End Date: Wednesday, June 30, 2021 

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s). 

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov. 

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2020 

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2020. Each selected artist will be placed in residence with a different City agency. 

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation.

Examples of PAIRs to date include Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh at the Commission on Human Rights, Taja Lindley at the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here. 

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply. 

Residency Structure: Research and Implementation Phases

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which launches a three-month Research Phase. This phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the host agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency. The project must be collaborative in nature and include one (1) public-facing event or component. Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project development. 

Artist Fee and Materials 

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., printing, fabrication, equipment rental, wages for collaborators, video production, etc.). The selected artist(s) are responsible for managing the project budget and submitting invoices. No additional funding is provided. 

DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR, rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions. All funds ($40,000 total) are paid directly to the artist, who manages all program costs. We encourage artists to take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit. 

Additionally, the artist receives: 

  • A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours. 
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts.

Artist Agreements and Intellectual Property Rights 

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works; and materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports and promotional materials) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements as soon as they are received to avoid delays. 

PAIR 2020 

PAIR 2020 will launch four new residencies with the following partner agencies: 

  • The Department of Sanitation 
  • The Commission on Human Rights 
  • The Civic Engagement Commission 
  • The Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice 

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence for the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice.

The other open calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls, but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency. 

About the Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice (MOCJ)

The New York City Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice (MOCJ) advises the Mayor and First Deputy Mayor on criminal justice policy and is the Mayor’s representative to the courts, district attorneys, defenders, and state criminal justice agencies, among others. The office designs, deploys, and evaluates citywide strategies to drive down crime, reduce unnecessary arrests and incarceration, and improve the system’s fairness. 

While New Yorkers are experiencing historically low citywide crime rates, there is also evidence of significant disparities in communities of color as it relates to public safety. MOCJ’s Office of Neighborhood Safety (ONS) is tasked with helping communities develop and scale up solutions to public safety issues by improving the sharing of existing resources and more holistic assistance for New Yorkers affected by violence.

ONS combines the Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety (MAP) and the Office to Prevent Gun Violence (OPGV). MAP started in response to a spike in violence in public housing and since 2014 has brought together over 27,000 residents, city agencies, and non-profits in 15 neighborhoods to identify and solve problems together, ranging from neighborhood issues such as youth engagement and workforce development to the quality of public spaces. OPGV is a community-led approach to reducing gun violence. The office supports the city’s Crisis Management System and engages with over 50 community partners in 22 neighborhoods to assist in mediating conflicts in the street, and preempt retaliation between individuals and groups, combining this approach with sustained community engagement, employment programs, mental health assistance, and trauma services. This approach has resulted in a 30% reduction in shootings over comparable neighborhoods. 

To learn more about MOCJ, ONS, and its other programs, please visit: https://criminaljustice.cityofnewyork.us/

The Challenge

MOCJ seeks artists who can help lead their efforts to reframe justice and engage the imaginations of community members in individual healing, community restoration, and systemic transformation. This residency will be centered on storytelling and collaboration with the selected artist(s) taking a neighborhood-based approach to their work. Negative narratives are often forced upon residents in communities that have been hit hard by disinvestment, racism and economic and social stressors. Despite these circumstances, and in many cases in spite of them, marginalized communities have rich stories and histories to share of their resilience and hard won victories. We seek to support residents to own and amplify their own narratives; ones that are powerful, representative and self-determined. 

Through changing the narrative, the artist will work with MOCJ’s Office of Neighborhood Safety to elevate the voices of community members who have been impacted by historic disinvestment. Specifically, we would like the artist to be based in Mott Haven to help heal historic trauma in a neighborhood that has borne the brunt of violence, but also where MOCJ has longstanding partnerships and investments. As the disparities are city-wide, the residency will also seek to create tools for communities across the city to use for further change. 

Bronx-based artists, and artists connected to Mott Haven specifically, are encouraged to apply. 

The Call 

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials: 

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words) 

Based on the background information provided by MOCJ, what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? (Note: We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.) 

2. Statement of Interest (250 words) 

How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with MOCJ 's constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific. 

3. Artist Statement (250 words) 

Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples. 

4. Resume or CV. 

Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call. 

5. References. Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference. 

6. Work Samples. Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials. 

7. Work Sample List. Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed. 

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria 

Artists responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, MOCJ, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as: 

  • Artistic merit and artistic excellence of the proposed project
  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
  • Quality of and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change 
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection. 

Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist(s) should be able to demonstrate a level of involvement/connection to the MOCJ’s mission and/or the challenge set forth in this call. They should have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within the framework of municipal systems. In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity). 
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor. 
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City. 
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

TIMELINE 

  • Application Deadline: 11:59pm on Sunday, March 29, 2020 
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of April 20 – May 1, 2020 

To take place at the Department of Cultural Affairs, 31 Chambers Street, NY NY, 10007 

  • Artist Selection/Notification: May 6, 2020 
  • Residency Start Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 
  • Residency End Date: Wednesday, June 30, 2021 

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s). 

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov. 

LYONS FAMILY OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS 

The City of New York seeks artists interested in creating a public monument for the Lyons Family to be installed in Central Park near the 106th Street west entrance. If you are such an artist, please apply to this open call by April 1, 2020.

BACKGROUND

On October 21, New York City announced the creation of a new monument in Central Park honoring the Lyons Family, an African American family who participated in some of the most seminal movements of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Consisting of Albro Lyons (1814-1896), Mary Lyons (1815-1894), and their daughter Maritcha Lyons (1848 –1929), these remarkable people led their community in the fight to make the City more, fair and just, especially as the nation struggled to overcome centuries of slavery before and after the Civil War. 

The monument, funded by the Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund , represents another step toward fostering a more diverse and inclusive public art collection for the City.

The proposed location for the monument is the Park entrance at 106th street and Central Park West and the current goal is to install the new permanent public artwork in 2022.

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS (RFQ) 

This Request for Qualifications (RFQ) is to solicit artists or artist teams who are interested in being considered to design a permanent public monument for the Lyons Family in Central Park. The artist chosen to design a monument will be determined through the City’s Percent for Art commissioning process. 

PROJECT BUDGET 

The Lyons Family monument is being funded by private foundations. The project budget is $1.15 million and must include all project costs, artist’s fees, design services, community engagement, site preparation, engineering, fabrication, travel, transportation of the work to the site, insurance, permits, installation, documentation of the artwork, and contingency. 

WHO MAY APPLY 

Professional visual artists or artist teams, working in any and all media, legally authorized to work in the U.S., and who are at least 18 years of age, are eligible to apply. Employees of the City of New York, Committee members (as defined in the following section) and their family members are not eligible to apply. If applying as an artist team, please identify the team member who will serve as the lead artist. 

SUBMISSION AND SELECTION PROCESS 

This open call is organized into two phases: 

Phase One is the RFQ in which artists or artist teams may respond with samples of past work and supplementary materials to be considered for the Lyons Family commission. The City, in partnership with an advisory committee of outside arts and design professionals (the “Committee”), will select artists to proceed to Phase Two of the open call (the “Finalists”). 

Phase Two is a Request for Conceptual Designs in which Finalists will submit a conceptual design for final review by the Committee. Finalists will receive a $1,500 honorarium for completion of a conceptual design in response to the Request for Conceptual Designs. One artist will be selected by the Committee from Phase Two to finalize designs, fabricate and install the artwork in partnership with the City (the “Selected Artist”).

Phase One: Request for Qualifications 

As part of Phase One, the City invites artists or artist teams to submit examples of past work for the Committee to review. Eligibility is based upon artistic merit as evidenced in previous work, though the artist or artist team need not have completed a prior permanent public commission. There is no submission fee. Submissions must be made online through https://nyculture.submittable.com/submit. Submissions must be completed by 11:59PM on April 1, 2020. 

Submission Materials 

Artists must submit all of the following materials for consideration: 

· Statement of Interest (250 words max) Provide a narrative description of your interest in the commission and your qualifications for undertaking such a project; how your art practice and process can be translated to this project and how you might approach this project. If you are applying as an artist team, your statement of interest should reflect the work and approach of the team. 

· Artist’s Statement (250 words max) Provide a narrative description of your past work and current practice, including reference to submitted work samples, as relevant. 

· Resume or CV (2 pages max) Provide a current resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence, any teaching experience, community engagement work, and/or experience working with multiple stakeholders. Be sure to include any relevant public or private commissioning experience. If you are applying as an artist team, combine your information into a two-page document that summarizes the team members’ qualifications. For example, a four-member team may choose to include a half-page bio for each team member. 

· References Provide the name, phone number and email addresses of two (2) professional references that have experience working with you as a partner or client on a creative project. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.

· Work Samples Provide 10 images of completed work. Images should be from 70 - 100 dpi. If you have video of your work that is relevant to this project (i.e. a kinetic sculpture or sound element), submit a PDF with a link to the video. Each video PDF link will count as one of your 10 images. Each video may be no longer than 3 minutes. If you are applying as an artist team, designate one artist to be the team leader to submit your information, along with team member(s) images and resume/bio(s). Submissions from artist teams should reflect samples from each artist on the team, and not exceed the overall submission limit of 10 images. 

· Work Sample List Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, locations, and/or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.

Phase Two: Request for Conceptual Designs 

As part of Phase Two, the City will invite the selected Finalists to submit conceptual proposals for review by the Committee. Finalists will receive an honorarium of $1,500 for submission of a conceptual proposal regardless of the number of concepts submitted. Percent for Art aspires to commission artwork of the highest caliber possible, and to set a national example for public art commissioning, while reflecting contemporary art practices and the vibrant communities where the work will be installed. The conceptual proposals will be judged against the following criteria: 

· Appropriateness of each artist’s approach to the site’s architecture, function, and users; 

· Skilled craftsmanship; 

· Clarity of artistic vision; 

· Consideration of the cost and durability of the artist’s chosen materials; and 

· That the artist’s public commission is true to his/her/their sensibility.

QUESTIONS 

Please direct all inquiries regarding this open call to Percent@culture.nyc.gov.

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs