OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2021

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Department of Records and Information Services

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking three (3) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2021. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Design and Construction, the Department of Sanitation, and the Department of Records and Information Services. This application is for a residency with the Department of Records and Information Services.

About PAIR

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation. Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 21 artists in 14 agencies, including Amanda Phingbodhippakia at the Commission on Human Rights, Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Yazmany Arboleda at the Civic Engagement Commission, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here.

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply.

Residency Structure

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a three-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency.

The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.

Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project production.

Artist Fee and Materials

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., materials, fabrication, participant stipends, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.

NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions.

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

· A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours

· Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts

Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works. Materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports, promotional materials, and campaign content) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements with trusted legal counsel as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2021

PAIR 2021 will launch three (3) new residencies with the following partner agencies:

· Department of Design and Construction

· Department of Sanitation

· Department of Records and Information Services

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the Department of Records and Information Services. The other 2021 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency.

About the Department of Records and Information Services (DORIS)

The Department of Records and Information Services (DORIS) preserves and provides public access to historical and contemporary records and information about New York City government. The Municipal Archives preserves over 200,000 cubic feet and over 300 TB of analog and digital documents, photographs, ledgers, maps, architectural renderings, manuscripts, and moving images. The Municipal Library makes available electronic and hard copies of City reports and offers research space. The Municipal Records Management Division establishes and enforces the City’s record management policies and operates record storage facilities. For more information about DORIS, visit About - Records (nyc.gov)

The Municipal Archives holds collections of New York City government’s records dating from the colonial period through the present. For PAIR this year, we believe there is a unique opportunity to use our audio visual recordings, which include WNYC TV programs dating from 1949-1995 and the NYPD surveillance films from the 1960s and 1970s.  During the past several years we have digitized much of this content, making it accessible, in many instances, for the first time since originally recorded or aired.  The WNYC collections showcase life in New York City with an intention to keep the public engaged in the City’s cultural, social and political worlds.  The New York Police Department Surveillance Film are comprised of black and white silent films taken for surveillance purposes documenting various political and activist groups.  The footage includes protests, strikes, and sit-ins focused on the end of segregation and the beginning of civil rights.

The Challenge

We believe that a Public Artist in Residence can provide a new lens to the access, presentation and use of archival records and provide an opportunity to share the historical records with broad, diverse audiences. Following financial and political crises in the 1970s, WNYC-TV secured a large amount of new funding and independence from City Hall in the 1980s. This revival was marked by a wealth of new, original series like Heart of the City, Neighborhood Voices and New York Hotline, as well as specials that showcased important events or guests in New York, like Nelson Mandela. These panel talk shows and cultural magazines focused on difficult issues the City faced in the 1980s and 1990s, like homelessness, the AIDS epidemic and race relations. They also featured thriving but overlooked community cultural organizations like the Nuyorican Poets Café or the Coop Theater in Brooklyn. The NYPD footage provides an extraordinary, rarely-seen visual record of one of the most tumultuous eras in American history. Among the highlights in the collection is footage of the first Earth Day march in 1970, a Nation of Islam rally, CORE and NAACP protests of segregation, Young Lords building occupations, early protests by gay-rights advocates, and massive anti-war marches and demonstrations after the Kent State shootings in May 1970. The recently digitized archival materials provide unique, credible documentation of comparable present-day civil unrest and media reporting.  While archival footage is often used for documentary purposes, we hope the PAIR artist would provide a faceted approach to the use and dissemination of the content that defined such pivotal periods for New York City.  More about these collections are available on the DORIS blogs, Preserving WNYC-TV and NYPD Surveillance Films.

The Call

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words) Based on the background information provided by the Department of Records and Information Services, what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency?(We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.)

2. Statement of Interest (250 words) How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific.

3. Artist Statement (250 words) Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples.

4. Resume or CV.Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call.

5. References. Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.

6. Work Samples.Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.

7. Work Sample List.Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria

Artist responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, DORIS, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:

· Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency

· Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work

· Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities

· Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change

· Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency

· Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.

Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist should be deeply interested in information systems and archival work in particular, have proficient research skills as well as demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within government structures.

In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City.
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

Timeline

· Application Deadline: Sunday, June 27, 2021. Applications must be submitted online via Submittable by 11:59pm on Sunday, June 27, 2021.

· Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of July 12, 2021Interviews will be conducted virtually.

· Artist Notifications: Week of July 19, 2021

· Residency Start Date: Monday, August 9, 2021

· Residency End Date: July 29, 2022

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2021

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Department of Design and Construction

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking three (3) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2021. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Design and Construction, the Department of Sanitation, and the Department of Records and Information Services. This application is for a residency with the Department of Design and Construction.

About PAIR

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation. Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 21 artists in 14 agencies, including Amanda Phingbodhippakia at the Commission on Human Rights, Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Yazmany Arboleda at the Civic Engagement Commission, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here.

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply.

Residency Structure

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a three-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency.

The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.

Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project production.

Artist Fee and Materials

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., materials, fabrication, participant stipends, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.

NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions.

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

· A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours

· Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts

Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works. Materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports, promotional materials, and campaign content) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements with trusted legal counsel as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2021

PAIR 2021 will launch three (3) new residencies with the following partner agencies:

· Department of Design and Construction

· Department of Sanitation

· Department of Records and Information Services

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the Department of Design and Construction. The other 2021 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency.

About the Department of Design and Construction

The New York City Department of Design and Construction (DDC) works with 28 City agencies to manage design and construction projects throughout the five boroughs. As the City's primary capital construction project manager, we build many of the civic facilities New Yorkers use every day. We provide communities with new or renovated structures such as firehouses, libraries, police precincts, courthouses, senior centers and more. For more information visit: www.nyc.gov/ddc

The Challenge(s)

At any time, DDC is managing hundreds of active capital construction projects in neighborhoods across the five boroughs that are critical to the provision of services and amenities the City provides its residents. We propose to utilize an artist residency to transform a construction site into a platform for exploring, imagining, creating, and enacting connections between neighbors and the public works that impact a neighborhood. We believe an artist could help DDC improve relationships between the City and the people who are impacted by construction, thereby building civic trust. An artist-initiated project could also demonstrate successful strategies for engaging neighbors in creative activities at other construction sites.

DDC proposes to select an artist to create an art project that engages with neighbors and community members around a DDC construction site. DDC would connect the selected artist with a capital project relevant to the artist’s work and can select from its wide-ranging portfolio of projects, including libraries, public safety facilities, cultural institutions, homeless shelters, buildings for health and human services, and roadway, sewer, and water main construction projects. DDC would assist the artist in learning about the project, including the neighborhood where the project is located, the project’s history, team, stakeholders, processes, goals, and timeline. With the support of DDC’s Public Art unit, and possibly with the assistance of DDC’s Office of Community Outreach and Notification (OCON), we will work with an artist to develop a site-specific project that directly engages people in a neighborhood impacted by construction.

DDC participated in the PAIR program in 2016, during which time artist Mary Miss served as the agency’s first ever Artist-in-Residence.  While at DDC, Miss explored the topic of “City as Living Lab: Engaging the Arts in Reimagining the City.” At the end of her residency, she developed a vision for Artist Initiated Projects aimed at integrating artists into capital construction projects.  We view this PAIR opportunity as an affirmation of her idea that municipal agencies should provide opportunity for artist-initiated projects. With the help of an artist, DDC construction projects could become sites of connection between community members and the public buildings and infrastructure in their neighborhood or perhaps demonstrate how public policy shapes the city through capital investments.


The Call
Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:
1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words). Based on the background information provided by the Department of Design and Construction, what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency?(We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.)
2. Statement of Interest (250 words).  How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific.
3. Artist Statement (250 words).  Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples.
4. Resume or CV.  Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call.
5. References.  Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.
6. Work Samples.  Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.
7. Work Sample List.  Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.


Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria
Artist responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, DDC, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:
· Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
· Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
· Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
· Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change
· Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
· Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations
Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.

Applicant Eligibility
The selected artist should be deeply interested in information systems and archival work in particular, have proficient research skills as well as demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within government structures.
In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City.
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

Timeline
· Application Deadline: Sunday, June 27, 2021. Applications must be submitted online via Submittable by 11:59pm on Sunday, June 27, 2021.
· Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of July 12, 2021Interviews will be conducted virtually.
· Artist Notifications: Week of July 19, 2021
· Residency Start Date: Monday, August 9, 2021
· Residency End Date: July 29, 2022

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).


If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2021

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Department of Sanitation

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking three (3) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2021. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Design and Construction, the Department of Sanitation, and the Department of Records and Information Services. This application is for a residency with the Department of Sanitation.

About PAIR

PAIR is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies to utilize their creative, collaborative art practice to offer innovative solutions to pressing civic challenges. Launched in 2015, the PAIR program takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the City’s first official artist in residence (1977), with the NYC Department of Sanitation. Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 21 artists in 14 agencies, including Amanda Phingbodhippakia at the Commission on Human Rights, Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, Yazmany Arboleda at the Civic Engagement Commission, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here.

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. Artists who are able to be flexible, adaptable, and can maneuver through different situations and populations are encouraged to apply.

Residency Structure

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a three-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining months of the residency.

The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.

Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project production.

Artist Fee and Materials

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., materials, fabrication, participant stipends, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.

NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions.

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

· A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours

· Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts

Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase). These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works. Materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports, promotional materials, and campaign content) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements with trusted legal counsel as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2021

PAIR 2021 will launch three (3) new residencies with the following partner agencies:

· Department of Design and Construction

· Department of Sanitation

· Department of Records and Information Services

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence for the Department of Sanitation.

The other open calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls, but can only be selected for one position. A separate application must be submitted for each agency.

About the Department of Sanitation (DSNY)

The Department of Sanitation (DSNY) keeps New York City healthy, safe and clean by collecting, recycling and disposing of waste, cleaning streets and vacant lots, and clearing snow and ice. DSNY is the world’s largest sanitation department. It collects more than 10,500 tons of residential and institutional garbage and 1,760 tons of recyclables – each day. While efficiently managing solid waste and clearing litter or snow from 6,300 miles of streets, the Department is also a leader in environmentalism — committing to sending zero waste to landfills.

The Challenge

Waste is a symptom of the human condition and DSNY sanitation workers are responders to these symptoms, playing an important role in the health and safety of New York City. We believe that there is great opportunity for an artist to explore the symbiotic relationship between the public and these responders and the opportunities that exist for the public to work with DSNY to make the City as healthy, safe, and clean as it can be.

In this upcoming fiscal year, in particular, we will be implementing two important programs:

· The return of curbside organics collection – making up approximately 1/3 of our waste stream, organics are the most significant opportunity to divert material from landfill and create compost and renewable energy. Organics collection was suspended during the pandemic but will return this fall with a new roll-out strategy aimed at optimizing our efficiency, lowering our carbon footprint, and broadening access to composting services. The more public demand that we see, the more our service will be able to grow.

· The DSNY-led reform of the commercial waste industry, one rife with safety and environmental issues. The new zoned system that DSNY will begin to implement in 2021 will create significant improvements to the oversite of commercial sanitation work in NYC. The results will be dramatic environmental improvements—including increased recycling targets and decreased air pollution from truck traffic—as well labor and safety improvements that will protect private sanitation workers and civilians alike. (In her book Picking Up, DSNY’s anthropologist-in-residence Robin Nagle notes that sanitation work is some of the most dangerous work in the country. 2018 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that refuse and recycling collection is about three times as deadly as police work and five times as deadly as firefighting. These dangers are particularly glaring in the “race to the bottom” private carting industry.) See DSNY’s Commercial Waste Zones Planfor more info on this effort.

DSNY seeks to work with an artist who will bring dignity, respect, and appreciation to our critical—but often invisible—workforce that makes life in New York City possible. Through this collaboration we hope to make our work more visible to the public and, at the same time, foster a greater appreciation for the artistic process within and among our own agency and workforce.

For this residency, DSNY encourages site visits to sanitation facilities throughout the City, which may require the need to wear safety equipment, such as hard hats, or may have some accessibility issues, such as the need to use staircases.

The Call

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words).  Based on the background information provided by DSNY what resonates with you, and what framing question or area of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? (Note: We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.)  
2. Statement of Interest (250 words).  How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific.
3. Artist Statement (250 words). Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples.
4. Resume or CV.  Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, foreign language skills, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or any experience related to the specific agency or challenge set forth in this call.
5. References.  Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.
6. Work Samples.  Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes. For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.
7. Work Sample List.  Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.


Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria
Artist responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, DSNY and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:
· Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to address during residency
· Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
· Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
· Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change
· Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
· Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations
Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.


Applicant Eligibility
The selected artist should be deeply interested in information systems and archival work in particular, have proficient research skills as well as demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within government structures.


In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City.
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.

Timeline
· Application Deadline: Sunday, June 27, 2021. Applications must be submitted online via Submittable by 11:59pm on Sunday, June 27, 2021.
· Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of July 12, 2021Interviews will be conducted virtually.
· Artist Notifications: Week of July 19, 2021
· Residency Start Date: Monday, August 9, 2021
· Residency End Date: July 29, 2022


This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).


If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs