BEYOND SIMS OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS
The City of New York seeks artists interested in creating a public monument to be installed at the site of the recently removed J. Marion Sims statue. If you are such an artist, please apply to this open call by January 31, 2019.


BACKGROUND

Building on recommendations of the Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments, and Markers and years of community activism, the statue of J. Marion Sims was removed from its location in Central Park in April of 2018. In addition to the relocation of the existing statue, the City has committed to working with local stakeholders to commission a new artwork for the site that moves beyond Sims’ legacy of medical experimentation and reinterprets the site where his sculpture formerly stood. 

In October 2018, the city announced that it has joined a community coalition dedicated to expanding representation through public artwork in East Harlem to explore the legacy of racism and inequities in reproductive justice in the medical community. Comprised of East Harlem advocacy groups, cultural organizations, City Council and Community Board representatives, and City agencies, the Committee to Empower Voices for Healing and Equity will work towards the goal of commissioning new permanent public artwork for the former site of a statue that honored J. Marion Sims. The current goal is to install the new permanent public artwork in 2020.

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS (RFQ)
This Request for Qualifications (RFQ) is to solicit artists or artist teams who are interested in being considered to design a permanent public monument for the location in Central Park that had sited J. Marion Sims. The artist chosen to design a monument will be determined through the City’s Percent for Art commissioning process.
 

PROJECT BUDGET
The project budget is up to $1 million and must include all project costs, including but not limited to the following: artist’s fees, design services, community engagement, site preparation, engineering, fabrication, travel, transportation of the work to the site, insurance, permits, installation, documentation of the artwork, and contingency.
 

WHO MAY APPLY
Professional visual artists or artist teams, working in any and all media, legally authorized to work in the U.S., and who are at least 18 years of age, are eligible to apply. Employees of the City of New York, Committee members (as defined in the following section) and their family members are not eligible to apply. If applying as an artist team, please identify the team member who will serve as the lead artist.

SUBMISSION AND SELECTION PROCESS
This open call is organized into two phases:
Phase One is the RFQ in which artists or artist teams may respond with samples of past work and supplementary materials to be considered for the Beyond Sims commission. The City, in partnership with an advisory committee of outside arts and design professionals (the “Committee”), will select artists to proceed to Phase Two of the open call (the “Finalists”).
Phase Two is a Request for Conceptual Designs in which Finalists will submit a conceptual design for final review by the Committee. Finalists will receive a $1,500 honorarium for completion of a conceptual design in response to the Request for Conceptual Designs. One artist will be selected by the Committee from Phase Two to finalize designs, fabricate and install the artwork in partnership with the City (the “Selected Artist”).


Phase One: Request for Qualifications
As part of Phase One, the City invites artists or artist teams to submit examples of past work for the Committee to review. Eligibility is based upon artistic merit as evidenced in previous work, though the artist or artist team need not have completed a prior permanent public commission.
There is no submission fee. Submissions must be made online through https://nyculture.submittable.com/submit. Submissions must be completed by 11:59PM on January 31, 2018. 


Submission Materials
Artists must submit all of the following materials for consideration:
· Statement of Interest (250 words max)
Provide a narrative description of your interest in the commission and your qualifications for undertaking such a project; how your art practice and process can be translated to this project and how you might approach this project. If you are applying as an artist team, your statement of interest should reflect the work and approach of the team.
· Artist’s Statement (250 words max)
Provide a narrative description of your past work and current practice, including reference to submitted work samples, as relevant.
· Resume or CV (2 pages max)
Provide a current resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence, any teaching experience, community engagement work, and/or experience working with multiple stakeholders. Be sure to include any relevant public or private commissioning experience. If you are applying as an artist team, combine your information into a two-page document that summarizes the team members’ qualifications. For example, a four-member team may choose to include a half-page bio for each team member.
· References
Provide the name, phone number and email addresses of two (2) professional references that have experience working with you as a partner or client on a creative project. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.
· Work Samples
Provide 10 images of completed work. Images should be from 70 - 100 dpi. If you have video of your work that is relevant to this project (i.e. a kinetic sculpture or sound element), submit a PDF with a link to the video. Each video PDF link will count as one of your 10 images. Each video may be no longer than 3 minutes. If you are applying as an artist team, designate one artist to be the team leader to submit your information, along with team member(s) images and resume/bio(s). Submissions from artist teams should reflect samples from each artist on the team, and not exceed the overall submission limit of 10 images.
· Work Sample List
Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, locations, and/or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.


Phase Two: Request for Conceptual Designs
As part of Phase Two, the City will invite the selected Finalists to submit conceptual proposals for review by the Committee. Finalists will receive an honorarium of $1,500 for submission of a conceptual proposal regardless of the number of concepts submitted.
Percent for Art aspires to commission artwork of the highest caliber possible, and to set a national example for public art commissioning, while reflecting contemporary art practices. The conceptual proposals will be judged against the following criteria:
· Appropriateness of each artist’s approach to the site’s architecture, function, and users;
· Skilled craftsmanship;
· Clarity of artistic vision;
· Consideration of the cost and durability of the artist’s chosen materials; and
· That the artist’s public commission is true to his/her/their sensibility.


QUESTIONS
Please direct all inquiries regarding this open call to Percent@culture.nyc.gov.

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2019

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Department for the Aging

The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2019. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Mental Health and Hygiene, the Department of Aging, the Department of Records and Information Services, and the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability. This application is for a residency with the Department for the Aging. 


About PAIR

DCLA’s Public Artist in Residence program (PAIR) is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies in order to use creative, collaborative art practice to propose and implement creative solutions to pressing civic challenges.

Launched in 2015, PAIR takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the first official artist in residence with the NYC Department of Sanitation (1977- present).  Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 10 artists in 8 agencies, including Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, The Lost Collective at the Administration for Children’s Services, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh at the Commission on Human Rights, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here.  

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides. 


Residency Structure

PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a three-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. 

The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining eight months of the residency. The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.  

Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project production.


Artist Fee and Materials

PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., printing, materials, equipment, video production, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.

NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions. 

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

  • A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours 
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts 

  

Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights

DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase).  These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works; and materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports and promotional materials) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements as soon as they are received to avoid delays.


PAIR 2019

PAIR 2019 will launch four new residencies with the following partner agencies: 

  • The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
  • The Department for the Aging
  • The Department of Records and Information Services
  • The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability 

  

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the Department for the Aging. The other 2019 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position.  A separate application must be submitted for each agency. 


About the New York City Department for the Aging 

New York City is home to approximately 1.64 million older adults, and the Department for the Aging (DFTA) is committed to helping them age in their homes and communities. Our mission is to eliminate ageism and ensure the dignity and quality of life of diverse older adults. We also work to support caregivers through service, advocacy, and education. We accomplish these goals by partnering with hundreds of community-based organizations to provide services through senior centers, naturally occurring retirement communities, case-management and home-care agencies, home-delivered meal programs, mental health and friendly visiting programs, and much more in each borough. DFTA also has a Senior Employment Services Unit, Caregiver Resource Center, Elderly Crime Victims Resource Center, Grandparent Resource Center, Foster Grandparent Program, Bill Payer Program, and Volunteer Resource Center. 

For more information about the Department for the Aging, visit https://www1.nyc.gov/site/dfta/index.page


The Challenge(s)

Unfortunately, many older adults encounter stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination on the basis of their age on a regular basis. Examples of ageism include older workers being let go in order to hire younger employees, the perpetuation of negative stereotypes of seniors in media, or the promotion of anti-aging ideals in society. As a result, ageism marginalizes and socially excludes older people in their communities, and has negative effects on older people’s health and wellbeing. 

As part of DFTA’s mission to ensure the dignity and quality of life of NYC’s older adults, DFTA is committed to ending ageism by changing the public’s perception about aging. This commitment is an ongoing effort, though there is often a disconnect between “ending ageism” as a conceptual aspiration that senior staff drive toward and the agency staff actively engaged in the effort with contract vendors and the field at large. We are interested in engaging an artist to work collaboratively with agency staff to deepen their understanding of ageism and its impact on NYC’s older adult population, and to empower staff to unlock new perspectives and approaches to fulfilling DFTA’s mission to help seniors age in place and have improved quality of life. 


The Call 

Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words)

Based on the background information provided by the Department for the Aging, what initial framing question(s) or lines of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? (We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.) 

2. Statement of Interest (250 words)
How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific. 

3. Work Samples.
Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes.  For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.

4. Work Sample List.
Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times. Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.

5. Artist Statement (250 words)
Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples.

6. Resume or CV.
Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or work with older adult populations (adults over age 65).  Indicate foreign language skills, if any.   

7. References.  
Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.


Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria

Artist responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, DFTA, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:

  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to  address during residency
  • Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change 
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
  • Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations 

Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.


Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist should be deeply involved in DFTA issues, have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within the framework of DFTA systems.  

In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).  
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City. 
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.


 Timeline

  • Application Deadline: Sunday, February 24, 2019
    Applications must be submitted online by 11:59pm on February 24, 2019
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of March 11-15, 2019
    Interviews will take place at the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, at 31 Chambers Street, in downtown Manhattan
  • Artist Notifications: Monday, March 18, 2019
  • Residency Start Date: Monday, April 1, 2019
  • Residency End Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2020


If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov. 


This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on  the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).


OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2019

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability
The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2019. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Mental Health and Hygiene, the Department of Aging, the Department of Records and Information Services, and the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability. 

This application is for a residency with the The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability.


About PAIR
DCLA’s Public Artist in Residence program (PAIR) is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies in order to use creative, collaborative art practice to propose and implement creative solutions to pressing civic challenges.


Launched in 2015, PAIR takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the first official artist in residence with the NYC Department of Sanitation (1977- present).  Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 10 artists in 8 agencies, including Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, The Lost Collective at the Administration for Children’s Services, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh at the Commission on Human Rights, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here. 


All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides.

Residency Structure
PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a three-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. 


The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining eight months of the residency. The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.  


Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project production.

Artist Fee and Materials
PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., printing, materials, equipment, video production, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.
NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions.

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

  • A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours 
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts 

  
Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights
DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase).  These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works; and materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports and promotional materials) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2019
PAIR 2019 will launch four new residencies with the following partner agencies: 

  • The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
  • The Department for the Aging
  • The Department of Records and Information Services
  • The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability 

  
This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability. The other 2019 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position.  A separate application must be submitted for each agency. 


About the Mayor's Office of Sustainabiility

The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability (MOS) is a team of architects, data scientists, engineers, policy advisors, and city planners responsible for developing policies and programs to enhance the near-term and long-term sustainability of the City of New York. MOS works to create a city where the air is clean, the streets are green and where our 8.5 million residents produce zero waste and zero carbon. MOS works to minimize NYC’s contributions to climate change from the waste, transportation, energy, and building sectors. By tackling the challenges posed by climate change with innovation, creativity, and inclusivity, we are improving the quality of life for all New Yorkers and protecting our planet at the same time. For more information, visit https://www1.nyc.gov/site/sustainability/index.page.

The Challenge(s)

Reports of the threats from a warming planet have been coming quickly and furiously over the past few years.  In New York City, we already experience the impacts of climate change.  When Hurricane Sandy struck in 2012, it caused $19 billion in damages and resulted in loss of life. We also experience summers that get hotter and flooding that becomes more regular every year. In fact, reports indicate that the impacts of climate change could get much worse very soon.  One of the most recent reports came just this past December: a startling analysis from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicts terrible food shortages, wildfires and a massive die-off of coral reefs as soon as 2040 unless governments take strong action today.

We know, despite the gravity and urgency of these reports and the potency of the realities we are already experiencing in our neighborhoods, that we have the tools, technology, and know-how to address these challenges head on. Apocalypse is not inevitable, and what New York City does to reimagine and create a city with zero impact on greenhouse gas emissions (it is possible!) can greatly improve quality of life for all New Yorkers.  And yet, many New Yorkers feel powerless to prevent climate change. Partially this is because of the enormity of the issue, but partially this is because they feel that as individuals, their contributions to the global effort are limited. 

New York City can become a city with zero impact on greenhouse gas emissions and can positively transform quality of life for all New Yorkers in the process. The question is, how can we convey this to New Yorkers? How can we turn the seriousness of climate change not into a reason for despair, but into a catalyst for transformation? How can public art address and change this sense of powerlessness to better empower New Yorkers in the fight to prevent the worst effects of climate change?


The Call
Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words)
Based on the background information provided by The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability, what initial framing question(s) or lines of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? (We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.) 


2. Statement of Interest (250 words)
How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific. 


3. Work Samples.
Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes.  For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.

4. Work Sample List.
Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times.  Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.


5. Artist Statement (250 words)
Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples.


6. Resume or CV.
Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders.  Indicate foreign language skills, if any.  


7. References.  
Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.


Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria
Artist responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, MOS, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:

  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to  address during residency
  • Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change 
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
  • Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations 

 Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.

Applicant Eligibility
The selected artist should be deeply involved in MOS issues, have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within the framework of MOS systems.  
In addition:

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists  or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).  
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City. 
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.

 
Timeline 

  • Application Deadline: Sunday, February 24, 2019
    Applications must be submitted online by 11:59pm on February 24, 2019
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of March 11-15, 2019
    Interviews will take place at the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, at 31  Chambers Street, in downtown Manhattan
  • Artist Notifications: Monday, March 18, 2019
  • Residency Start Date: Monday, April 1, 2019
  • Residency End Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2020


If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.
 


This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on  the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2019
NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Department of Records and Information Services
The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2019. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Mental Health and Hygiene, the Department of Aging, the Department of Records and Information Services, and the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability.  This application is for a residency with the Department of Records and Information Services.


About PAIR
DCLA’s Public Artist in Residence program (PAIR) is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies in order to use creative, collaborative art practice to propose and implement creative solutions to pressing civic challenges.
Launched in 2015, PAIR takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the first official artist in residence with the NYC Department of Sanitation (1977- present).  Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 10 artists in 8 agencies, including Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, The Lost Collective at the Administration for Children’s Services, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh at the Commission on Human Rights, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here.

All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides.
 

Residency Structure
PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a three-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio.

The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining eight months of the residency. The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.  

Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project production.

Artist Fee and Materials
PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., printing, materials, equipment, video production, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.

NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions.

In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives:

  • A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours 
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts 

 
Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights
DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase).  These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works; and materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports and promotional materials) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2019
PAIR 2019 will launch four new residencies with the following partner agencies: 

  • The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
  • The Department for the Aging
  • The Department of Records and Information Services
  • The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability 

 

This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the Department of Records and Information Services. The other 2019 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position.  A separate application must be submitted for each agency.

About the Department of Records and Information Services 

The Department of Records and Information Services (DORIS) preserves and provides public access to historical and contemporary records and information about New York City government. The Municipal Archives preserves over 200,000 cubic feet of original documents, photographs, ledgers, maps, architectural renderings, manuscripts, and moving images. The Municipal Library makes available electronic and hard-copies of City reports and offers research space. The Municipal Records Management Division establishes and enforces the City’s record management policies and operates record storage facilities. 

DORIS has initiated three community focused programs to gather contemporary information to supplement holdings in the Municipal Archives. We would like to develop a creative approach that makes our oldest collection—Dutch Colonial records that represent the City’s earliest documentary heritage—relevant to modern audiences. We have digitized these collections, created an interactive online presence, and collaborated with various cultural institutions, world-wide, to engage wide audiences. Through the PAIR program we hope to engage an artist to use the historical records to develop an entirely new interpretation. Creating interpretation beyond the written word would further our mission to provide access to our historical records to even wider audiences.

The Challenge(s)
Our Dutch collections can be an intimidating resource- the manuscript ledgers are fragile and can be a challenge to read.  But they provide an incredibly detailed account of everyday life in New Amsterdam.  Typically, researchers of the colonial collections have been scholars and genealogists, and in some instances students using our digital resources. Having an artist study, interpret, and create a unique experience for a wider audience would, we believe, open gateways to this and other collections.   We would work collaboratively with the artist and other cultural heritage institutions to emphasize the role of the historical record in modern discourse and community engagement.

The Call
Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words)
Based on the background information provided by The Department of Records and Information Services, what initial framing question(s) or lines of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? (We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.)

2. Statement of Interest (250 words)
How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific.

3. Work Samples.
Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes.  For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.

4. Work Sample List.
Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times.  Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.

5. Artist Statement (250 words)
Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples.

6. Resume or CV.
Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, and/or work with primary sources. Indicate foreign language skills, if any.  

7. References.  
Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.


Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria
Artist responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, DORIS, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:

  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to  address during residency
  • Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change 
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
  • Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations 

  Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.


Applicant Eligibility
The selected artist should be deeply involved in DORIS issues, have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within the framework of DORIS systems.  

In addition: 

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).  
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City. 
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.

  
Timeline 

  • Application Deadline: Sunday, February 24, 2019
    Applications must be submitted online by 11:59pm on February 24, 2019
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of March 11-15, 2019
    Interviews will take place at the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, at 31  Chambers Street, in downtown Manhattan
  • Artist Notifications: Monday, March 18, 2019
  • Residency Start Date: Monday, April 1, 2019
  • Residency End Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2020

  

If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.


This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on  the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).

 

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS: PUBLIC ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE (PAIR) 2019
NYC Department of Cultural Affairs & the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
The NYC Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA) is seeking four (4) artists to join the Public Artists in Residence (PAIR) program in 2019. One (1) selected artist will be placed in residence with each of the following City agencies/offices: The Department of Mental Health and Hygiene, the Department of Aging, the Department of Records and Information Services, and the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability. This application is for a residency with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

About PAIR
DCLA’s Public Artist in Residence program (PAIR) is based on the premise that artists are creative problem solvers. To that end, DCLA embeds socially engaged artists in New York City municipal agencies in order to use creative, collaborative art practice to propose and implement creative solutions to pressing civic challenges.
Launched in 2015, PAIR takes its name and inspiration from the pioneering work of artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, the first official artist in residence with the NYC Department of Sanitation (1977- present).  Since establishing the program, DCLA has embedded 10 artists in 8 agencies, including Tania Bruguera at the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, The Lost Collective at the Administration for Children’s Services, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh at the Commission on Human Rights, among others. For a full list of PAIRs to date, click here. 


All of the PAIR partnerships – some of which are still ongoing – vary greatly in concept, scope, duration, and populations engaged, and their successes are driven by the openness of the partner agencies and the artist-led, collaborative process that the PAIR program framework provides.

Residency Structure
PAIR residencies begin with a required half-day orientation session, which kicks off a three-month Research Phase. This Phase is a time for the artist and agency to establish mutual trust through shared exposure to each other’s work and process—the artist shadows agency staff and attends meetings, trainings and site visits, and in turn the agency hosts an artist talk and visits the artist at their studio. 


The Research Phase ends with the artist proposing a project, designed in collaboration with the partner agency, to produce during the remaining eight months of the residency. The Implementation Phase of the residency is marked by approval of the project proposal and initiation of the work. The proposed project must be collaborative in nature and include at least one (1) public-facing event or component. Both DCLA and the partner agency will continue to provide the artist support during the project’s production for the duration of the residency.  


Throughout the residency, the artist and agencies have weekly check-ins by phone or in-person to assist in project production.

Artist Fee and Materials
PAIR funding per residency is $40,000: $20,000 for the Research Phase and $20,000 for the Implementation Phase. Funding is inclusive of related project expenses (e.g., printing, materials, equipment, video production, etc.). All funds are paid directly to the artist, who is responsible for managing their own project budgets and submitting invoices on a timely basis. No additional funding is provided. We recommend that the artist take a $20,000 artist fee and use $20,000 for the project budget. However, it is up the to the artist’s discretion to use the fee as they see fit.


NOTE: DCLA advocates strongly for fair artist wages. Given that PAIR awards are fixed, we strongly encourage individual artists to apply for PAIR rather than artist collectives that would have to share the award. Collectives are still welcome to apply, knowing the financial restrictions. 


In addition to the $40,000, the artist receives: 

  • A desk at the host agency, with office access based on regular building hours 
  • Access to materials/supplies at DCLA’s Materials for the Arts 

  
Artist Agreement and Intellectual Property Rights
DCLA understands the importance of artists’ intellectual property rights. Prior to the start date of each phase of the program, the selected artists will be required to sign two (2) Public Artist in Residence Agreements (one for the Research Phase and one for the Implementation Phase).  These agreements include fixed provisions regarding intellectual property and make the following distinction: artist(s) own and maintain rights over artistic works developed during the program (such as visual art, performances and literary materials) that are not intended to be used by a City agency or program, subject to certain restrictions and the City’s license to use such artistic works; and materials developed specifically for City purposes (such as reports and promotional materials) will be owned by the City. Selected artists are strongly encouraged to review the Agreements as soon as they are received to avoid delays.

PAIR 2019
PAIR 2019 will launch four new residencies with the following partner agencies:  

  • The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
  • The Department for the Aging
  • The Department of Records and Information Services
  • The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability 

  
This is an open call for a Public Artist in Residence with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The other 2019 PAIR Artist Open Calls can be found here. Artists may apply to multiple open calls but can only be selected for one position.  A separate application must be submitted for each agency.


About The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH)

DOHMH protects and promotes the health of all New Yorkers. We're one of the largest public health agencies in the world. We're also one of the nation's oldest public health agencies, with more than 200 years of leadership in the field.  Our work is broad-ranging. The challenges we face are many. They range from obesity, diabetes and heart disease to HIV/AIDS, tobacco addiction, substance abuse and the threat of bioterrorism. We’re also working to address enduring gaps in health between white New Yorkers and communities of color. Structural racism is at the root of these health inequities, which is why the Department has made racial justice a priority.

As a division of DOHMH, the Center for Health Equity (CHE) strengthens the agency’s goal to eliminate health inequities, or unjust differences in health outcomes, for residents in neighborhoods impacted by racism and long-term disinvestment by organizations and institutions. It works toward a fair and healthy New York where all residents—regardless of their zip code—have the opportunity to lead their healthiest lives. It does this by using data and storytelling to highlight injustices, influencing policy, systems, and environmental change, and implementing neighborhood-based strategies and programs to foster health.

CHE’s Neighborhood Health Action Centers offer coordinated health and social services, as well as community programs and initiatives under one roof.  Neighborhood engagement and working alongside devoted community based organizations, partner agencies, and activated residents to foster change, is key to the Action Center model.  Action Centers respond to the needs elevated by neighborhood voices and strive to improve conditions. At present, they are deploying behavioral health teams to normalize conversations around mental health in communities of color and improve coordination of services. They are also supporting the Neighborhood Strategy of DOHMH’s Birth Equity approach to address the root causes of persistent and preventable racial/ethnic disparities in maternal and infant mortality.  

For more information about DOHMH’s Center for Health Equity, visit https://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/health/neighborhood-health/center-for-health-equity.page

The Challenge(s)

DOHMH’s Center for Health Equity is seeking an artist to support community engagement strategies that deepen our collective understanding of how racism and gender oppression affect birth outcomes. In New York City, Black women are more likely to die from a pregnancy-related cause than White women. Aligning with the implementation of the Birth Equity approach at the Bronx Neighborhood Health Action Centers, we seek an artist interested in the work of amplifying community resilience, connecting people to programs, and helping invigorate the Action Centers as dynamic community assets reflective of community values, voices and visions. DOHMH faces challenges in driving community residents to the Action Centers. Research shows that the degree to which an individual is interconnected and embedded in a community is vital to an individual’s health and well-being. As the Center for Health Equity shifts its approaches to foster civic engagement, build community capacity and address root causes of health inequities, it is crucial that we are leading with community-driven processes.


The Call
Interested artists must submit all of the following application materials:

1. Framing Question or Area of Inquiry (100 words)
Based on the background information provided by the Department of Health and Mental Hygene, what initial framing question(s) or lines of inquiry would you hope to address during the residency? (We expect questions and areas of inquiry to evolve during the residency.) 


2. Statement of Interest (250 words)
How does your previous work and process of collaboration relate to your framing question or area of inquiry? Using examples from your past work, explain how your practice has intersected with the agency’s constituents and/or areas of focus. What was one challenge that you faced during this work and how did you address it? Please be specific. 


3. Work Samples.
Provide up to 10 digital images of recent works and/or up to 3 links to video or audio with maximum lengths of 5 minutes.  For literary projects, submit samples no longer than 2-3 pages of scripts, poetry, prose or other relevant materials.

4. Work Sample List.
Provide a list of submitted work, including title, date, materials and dimensions, or running times.  Include 1-2 sentence descriptions as needed.

5. Artist Statement (250 words)
Provide a statement pertaining to the submitted work samples.

6. Resume or CV.
Provide a resume or CV, highlighting artistic excellence and any community engagement work, teaching experience, experience working with multiple stakeholders, work in the South Bronx and/or work with social justice and advocacy organizations.  Indicate foreign language skills, if any.  

7. References.  
Provide the names, phone numbers and emails of two (2) professional references. Please indicate your relationship to each reference.

Selection Process and Evaluation Criteria
Artist responses will be reviewed by a panel of representatives from DCLA, DOHMH, and invited professionals with expertise in contemporary art. The panel will review applications for completeness, eligibility, and quality, as well as:

  • Clarity of framing question or area of inquiry to  address during residency
  • Quality and relevance of the applicant’s prior work
  • Evidence of experience creating socially engaged art and working collaboratively with communities
  • Evidence of experience working at the intersection of art and politics and/or using art for social or political change 
  • Evidence of experience developing and engaging in a collaborative process with multiple partners with a high level of competency
  • Evidence of flexibility, adaptability, and ability to maneuver through different situations and populations 

 Finalists will be asked to interview with the panel prior to final selection.


Applicant Eligibility

The selected artist should be deeply involved in DOHMH issues, have demonstrated experience with social interventions through artistic practice, and have a desire to work specifically within the framework of DOHMH systems.  

In addition: 

  • Applications will be accepted from individual artists or artist collectives only (artists cannot apply for or receive funds on  behalf of a non-profit organization or a for-profit entity).  
  • Artists must be 18 years of age of older and residents of New York City.
  • Artists must be eligible to work in New York City. 
  • Artists may not be currently enrolled in school.
  • Artists can apply directly without a fiscal sponsor.

 
Timeline

  • Application Deadline: Sunday, February 24, 2019
    Applications must be submitted online by 11:59pm on February 24, 2019
  • Artist Finalist Interviews: Week of March 11-15, 2019
    Interviews will take place at the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, at 31  Chambers Street, in downtown Manhattan
  • Artist Notifications: Monday, March 18, 2019
  • Residency Start Date: Monday, April 1, 2019
  • Residency End Date: Tuesday, March 31, 2020

 
If you have questions about the application process or residency structure, please contact us at PAIR@culture.nyc.gov.

This open call does not represent any obligation or agreement whatsoever on  the part of the City. The City is under no legal obligation to select an artist for the residency, and the City reserves the right to reject any or all applications, amend or withdraw this open call in whole or in part, and negotiate with one or more artist(s).

NYC Department of Cultural Affairs